fbpx

AI And The Future Of Work

Share on facebook
Share
Share on linkedin
Share
Share on twitter
Tweet
Untitled design(27)

Introduction

Automation has long been a hot-button issue in the economy. As technologies like robotics, artificial intelligence and machine learning become more advanced, the landscape of what it means to be “employed” is changing dramatically. I think this trend will largely be a good thing for the economy as a whole; we’ll be able to do incredible things previously thought impossible. But there are going to be some growing pains along the way.

The creative economy is poised for disruption.

The creative economy is poised for disruption.

Creative industries have long been viewed as a bright spot in the economy, and that’s because they’re growing faster than others. Creative jobs are expected to grow faster than others, too—a trend driven by AI-enabled automation that allows companies to streamline previously labor-intensive workflows and reduce costs. In fact, AI is already being used in some of those same creative industries we’ve come to know so well: advertising, animation, publishing and graphic design (to name just a few). As technology continues to evolve at an exponential rate—and as more tools make it possible for people without technical backgrounds or coding skills to create tomorrow’s art—we’re going to see more creative use cases for artificial intelligence emerge over time (think music video directors turning their sets into virtual reality experiences).

Machine learning is already helping us to understand creativity.

  • Machine learning is already helping us to understand creativity.
  • Machine learning can help us understand why creativity works.
  • Machine learning can help us understand how creativity can be improved.
  • Machine learning can help us understand how creativity can be applied in different contexts.

“Creative machines” will help us solve problems in new ways.

AI is the next step in a centuries-long process of technological advancement. The invention of the printing press, for example, allowed us to share ideas and information more easily than ever before. The invention of the computer allowed us to store and process that information faster than ever before. Now, AI allows us to analyze that information in new ways—and it’s only going to get better from here!

AI will make creativity more accessible.

AI will make creativity more accessible.

AI will help us to understand creativity.

AI will help us to create new things.

AI will help us to solve problems.

AI will help us to make new discoveries and connections by finding patterns in data that humans might otherwise have missed, or at least, would have had a difficult time identifying as significant on their own.

There’s a lot of “creative” work that could be done better by algorithms, and a lot of people whose jobs will be affected.

So, what does this mean for the future of work? AI will take over many creative tasks. But who is going to be affected? There’s a lot of “creative” work that could be done better by algorithms, and a lot of people whose jobs will be affected.

Employees that perform routine tasks are the most susceptible to losing their jobs to AI technologies. For example, retail employees who stock shelves or cashiers who scan barcodes and accept payments will see their roles automated by technology in the next 10 years. These are not professions that require deep thinking or creativity; they are simply ways for humans to do things more efficiently than machines can do them. They’ll become obsolete when machines can do these things better than humans ever could have imagined possible before!

Employees with more complex or abstract tasks may find themselves doing less work in the future due to AI technologies — but they should also find themselves doing more interesting work! The rise of automation has already begun shifting economic value away from routine labor (like manufacturing) toward higher value-added opportunities such as software engineering and data science: occupations which require critical thinking skills rather than just physical labor alone.”

Conclusion

Clearly, AI is here to stay. There are certainly questions about ethics that need to be addressed, but the most pressing concerns will likely be the impact of AI on jobs and economies. The next few decades may see massive changes in many industries, as we incorporate automation and machine learning into everything from farming and transportation to healthcare and education. Fortunately, there are ways we can prepare for this future—for example, by training people in new areas where their skills are needed: data science or design or product management. But it’s also important to acknowledge that our current educational system isn’t doing a great job of preparing students for these kinds of demands; some schools have already begun addressing these issues by offering classes like Computer Science Principles (K-12), while others are experimenting with interdisciplinary methods such as design thinking (higher ed). It will take time before we understand all of AI’s implications, but one thing is certain: innovation will continue unabated whether we want it or not.”

Share on facebook
Share
Share on linkedin
Share
Share on twitter
Tweet

Related Posts

Authors

IMG
Hannah
a
Jin

About HKCC

Hong Kong Coding Club is a social coding club for children, teenagers, and young adults who want to learn how to code. We’ve created a number of online coding challenges to help those who are new to coding get started.

We believe that everyone is proficient in at least one field. The goal is to recognize and capitalize on your skills. Assist your child in achieving his or her creative and technical goals.